CSC 270 Computer Organization

Weber/Fall, 2013

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A7: due Nov 20
Translate printBinary.cpp into Pep/8 assembly language. Make as accurate a translation as possible, including building a call frame for main. However, use a two-byte local variable n and parameter n, and treat them as unsigned int. Also, you can "cheat" and use DECO to print out two byte unsigned int variables, even though it would print out the wrong values for numbers greater than 32767.
A6: due Nov 8 Nov 11
Do exercises 9 and 14, and problem 26 from chapter 5. Turn in your answers to the two exercises on paper and the .pep file from problem 26 by email.
A5: due 10/21
Turn in the answers to exercises 45, 47, 52b-f, 53b-f and 55abcd from Chapter 3.
A4: due 10/11
Turn in the answers to exercises 4, 6, 7de, 9, 16, 18, 20, 21de, 23, 25, 28, 31, 35, 37, 39, 43b from Chapter 3.
A3: due 10/7
Write a C++ function named getDigits, that will take three parameters—unsigned int[] d, unsigned int n, and unsigned int b—and put the digits of the base b representation of n into the array d.  The function should also return the number of digits as an unsigned int.You can assume that the array d has been allocated with enough slots for all the possible digits, but you should check to make sure that n is at least 2.  Also write a C++ program (using cin and cout for input and output) to test your function.  Hand in the function and the test program (they can be declared in the same file) by email to weberk@mountunion.edu.
A2: due 9/20
Turn in the answers to exercises 2cde, 3c (read directions carefully!), 4, 5b, 7ab, and 8 from Chapter 2.
A1: due 9/13
Write a C++ function that will take three parameters—an array of int, the size of the array, and an int value to match—and return the lowest position in the array whose contents match the value given by the parameter.  Decide on what the function should return if the value isn't in the array and describe that behavior in a comment just above the function declaration.  Also write a C++ program (using cin and cout for input and output) to test your function.  Hand in the function and the test program (they can be declared in the same file) by email to weberk@mountunion.edu.

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